Tag Archives: meditation and mental health

July 29

Journey to Mental Clarity

One thing I tell my students when they begin a meditation practice is to let go of trying to do it perfectly. There is no perfect. You can’t mess it up. Just begin. And you’ll see how meditation benefits your mind and body.

July 08

Meditation, Guts & Brains

An eight week study conducted by Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) determined that meditation literally rebuilds the brains grey matter in just eight weeks. It’s the very first study to document that meditation produces changes over time in the brain’s grey matter.

May 30

11 Habits of Mindful People

If you want to start living more in the present and improve both your physical and mental health, consider taking on these 11 daily habits of mindful people.

May 20

Tech Tools to Relax

We all experience tension in our lives. In fact, technology can often be a source of the tension. But technology can also help us relax and think less about our troubles.

May 20

Deliver Us From Burnout

What do you do for fun? This is an important question I have started to ask patients so I can get to know them better and assess whether they find joy in their lives. I appreciate that the absence of joy can be a significant contributor to absence of personal health and sense of wellness.

April 29

Mindfulness Instead of Meds?

For many people, mindfulness meditation is a beautiful and life changing tool to handle difficult emotions. We can’t control our emotions, and the more that we try to stop anxiety, or sadness, or fear from coming up, the more it comes up. With mindfulness, we gain distance from our thoughts and emotions, looking at them rather than from them.

March 28

Mindfulness & Self-Destruction

trying to “turn off” emotions is like putting an airtight lid on a pot of boiling water. The steam and pressure (the emotions) will continue to build – until you may feel you are constantly under pressure. Eventually, the pot will explode, which is when emotions feel especially unbearable. Consequently, you may feel compelled to try to “turn off” the heightened emotions by engaging in the dysregulated behavior again.

And the spiral will continue.

However, methods exist that can improve your chances of breaking free of this spiral. One of those methods is mindfulness practice.